Horse Racing Betting

Horse Racing is undoubtedly the sport most entwined with betting. Essentially, for generations we have indulged in the long standing tradition of having a little flutter on which equine mustang will get his or her nostrils past the finishing post in first place. As disclaimer laws dictate, we must advise you that not all horses fall into the category of beautifully striding, speedy individuals. They can also arrive at race tracks around the world disguised as such, however run to the equivalent of an equine version of a Fiat Punto. (We won't mention any names, but we've all been guilty of backing one from time to time).

Betting on Horse Racing has continued its growth worldwide, as a result of the broadcasting of its marquee races and festivals, such as the Grand National, Cheltenham Festival, Royal Ascot, Melbourne and Breeders' Cup.

Top 5 Horse Racing Bets.

1.The Win Bet.

The most frequent bet placed on Horse Racing with online bookmakers and in shops around the globe is the traditional 'Win Bet'. You'll be selecting a horse running in a particular race that you believe has the best chance of finishing that race in first place. If your selected runner does indeed cross the finishing line before it's rivals, your betting bank will get an attractive boost.

2.Each Way Betting.

An each way bet is divided into two individual bets. You'll be betting on your chosen horse to finish in either first place, insuring you receive the biggest pay-out from your bet, OR, you have the security that if your horse finishes 'placed' you'll also get a return. 'Placed horses' are often the first three horses to cross the finishing line (1st, 2nd and 3rd) however, this varies depending on how many runners participate in your selected race. Look out for these, as the majority of bookmakers display the place terms on the individual race pages on their websites.

3.Multiple Bets. (Doubles, Trebles and Upwards)

If you've uncovered a talent for picking out winning selections as a matter of usual practice, you might want to consider placing some multiple bets. These bets consist of selecting two or more horses in different races to win. A multiple bet increases your returns without having to also increase your own stake. For example, If you have spotted two horses that you believe to have a great chance of winning their individual races, and are priced at 2/1 and 5/2, if you were to have £20 on each to win (staking a total of £40) If both did indeed win, you'll collect the handsome sum of £130. However, if you were to to place these same selections in a multiple bet and only risk half of your total stake, and have a £20 double bet, you would collect a whopping return of £210, sounds good to us.

Multiple bets are also uncomplicated to work out, take the double from above as an example. The stake of £20 would be placed onto your initial 2/1 selection, which would return £60 in total after winning, this would then automatically be placed onto your 5/2 horse, and as we've already uncovered your talents for picking out winners, this horse also goes on to win, and you collect £210.

4. Lucky 15 Betting.

Lucky 15 Betting has become increasingly popular with punters, predominately due to bonuses and special concessions now offered by the majority of online and high street bookmakers. A Lucky 15 bet consists of selecting four horses, each running in a different race. Similarly to Each Way betting, the Lucky 15 has its own individual bets, a clue to the number of bets involved is in the name, fifteen.

This bet consists of:

4 Single Bets (One for each of your selected horses)

6 Doubles (Selections A & B as one double, selections A & C as another, and so on until all combinations are covered)

4 Treble Bets (Just like the doubles, selections A & B & C would make up one of your treble bets, and selections A & B & D would make up another)

And finally 1 Fourfold Bet, which simply is a multiple bet on all four of your chosen horses.

Now to the fun part. Bookmakers often offer various bonuses and concessions on these type of bets. These include a 10 % bonus on your returns if all four of your horses win, and if only one of your runners manages to win, bookmakers often also offer a consolation, by doubling or trebling the odds of your only winning selection. The important thing to note here is, these offers vary from bookmaker to bookmaker, so shop around before placing your Lucky 15 bets.

5. Forecast, Tricast and Combinations.

Perhaps the most challenging but rewarding bets of our Top 5 is, Forecast, Tricast and Combination Betting. When placing a forecast bet, you are attempting to predict which horse will finish in 1st place along with the horse that ends the race in 2nd, in that correct order, this is also known as a 'Straight Forecast'. If you've studied the form book, calculated and deliberated but still can't split a pair of horse you believe have the beating of the field, you could also place a 'Reverse Forecast'. This would double your stake, however should your two chosen horses finish in the first two places, in any order, you would be rewarded with a very gratifying forecast dividend worth bragging about.

If you are undaunted by the difficultly of predict a straight or reverse forecast, you might want to take up the challenge, and throw your hat into the ring of a tricast bet. With a tricast bet, you'll not only be attempting to predict which horses finish in 1st and 2nd but also the 3rd placed runner, in that particular order. The prize for successfully predicting a tricast can be very fruitful indeed.

The introduction of combination betting has aided the punter with the above bets. You'll still be selecting your horses to finish 1st and 2nd (For Forecast Betting) and 1st, 2nd and 3rd (For Tricast Betting) however, with combination betting, you won't have to select the order your horses finish in. As long as your selected runners fill the first two (Forecast) or first three (Tricast) places in any order, you'll have yourself a winning combination.

 Horse Racing Betting Lingo & Terminology.

We now continue our MonsterBet starters guide to Horse Racing Betting, as we take a look at some of the terminology and words you'll undoubtedly hear and read, when studying racing form and placing your bets.

All Weather Racing – Racing in Britain in particular has invariably been vulnerable to adverse weather conditions, causing many scheduled fixtures to be abandoned. The introduction of all weather tracks such as Lingfield, Kempton, Wolverhampton and Southwell, provides artificial surfaces for races to be run on a regular basis.

Ante Post Betting – Betting on an upcoming race prior to the day of the race itself.

Apprentice Jockey – An apprentice jockey is usually a jockey at the beginning of his or her race riding career. The principal advantage of betting on a horse ridden by an apprentice jockey, is the weight allowance he or she gets for riding against more experienced professionals. This would mean a horse would be carrying less weight on its back than it would if an experienced pilot was on board.

Banker – A selection that a punter would consider to be a near certainty.

Blinkers – A piece of equipment fitted to a horses head that restricts its field vision in order to help concentration whilst racing. The application of such headgear could bring out potential improvement from a horse, however is also seen as a sign of temperament.

Bumpers – A horse that has a future of jumping a hurdle or fence tends to start out in bumper races. These races are run on the flat without any obstacles, and are predominantly run at the end of a National Hunt meeting.

C&D – Always important to look out for this when studying a horses chances. If you see C&D in the horses form book, it means it has already won over the same course and distance previously.

Dead Heat – A dead heat occurs when two or more horses' finishing positions cannot be separated.

Drifter – When a horses odds drift (get bigger) this is classed as drifting in the market, For example, from 3/1 to 5/1.This could be because the horse is unsupported in the market or other horses are preferred and are being backed. However, this does not always mean a horse won't win because it is friendless in the market, drifters do win on occasions.

Favourite – The shortest price horse in a particular race. A favourite is perceived as having the best chance of winning by the market.

Going – The going description of a race track is key to a horses chances of winning. 'The Going' is the condition of the surface at the track (for example, Good, Firm, Heavy). Ideally you would be looking for a horse that has form of running and performing well on a particular going.

Handicap – Horses perceived to have more ability than others in an individual race by official handicappers, have more weight added to there saddles in order to produce a more even race. You may have spotted something within a horse that the official handicapper hasn't, this would be a perfect opportunity to capitalise on this and back an 'underrated' horse at value odds.

Laying – When laying a selection, you are placing a bet on that selection not to win.

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